Grady-White Marlin 300
SEPTEMBER 2001
 
 
 
Length overall  32'7"
Beam  10'7"
Bridge clearance w/ hardtop  9'9"
Hull draft  19'
Maximun hp  500hp
Fuel Capacity  306 gals
Displacement  7,000lb (w/o engine)
Standard power  twin Yamaha 250hp outboard engine
Price  $153,785




The galley station (top) at the foot of the companionway steps has all you really need in one compact unit, including a sink, a small DC fridge, microwave, a single-burner alcohol/electric stove, and storage. (above) The step up to the helm deck opens up for more storage. Under the seat to port there's a 275-quart insulated fish box with an outboard drain. The walkaround decks are recessed all the way up to the bow, providing sure footing for a safe, secure feeling when docking, anchoring, or casting off the bow. An anchor windlass is available as an option, as are air conditioning, a generator, outriggers and other extras.

It was one of those rare brilliant summer days when we headed out of Rockhold Creek onto Herring Bay aboard a Grady-White Marlin 300 with Steve Lanham, yard manager for Tri-State Marine, the dealer located in Deale, Md., south of Annapolis. It was hot but not muggy, and the ospreys floated in a deep blue sky as we performed a graceful slalom through the crab pot buoys that peppered the water between the mouth of the creek and the open Chesapeake.

Glen Grady and Don White started building wooden lapstrake-hull fishing boats in Greenville, NC, in 1958. The Smith family bought the company a decade later, and Eddie Smith, Jr., has been in charge ever since. Under his supervision, the company completed the transformation from wood to building boats with fiberglass.

Every Grady-White hull and deck is built with 100 percent hand-laid fiberglass, with foam flotation sprayed into the hull, deck and liner to make the boat unsinkable. They introduced the walk-around cabin design i n 1975, and now build seven walk-around models from 20 feet long up to the 30-foot-long Marlin 300, which originally made its debut in 1989. Over the past decade, all of the Grady-White hulls have been redesigned by the prestigious marine architect team of C. Raymond Hunt Associates.

With such a pedigree, it's easy to see why Grady-White boats enjoy such a good reputation for reliability and performance. So my expectations were high, and I was not disappointed. Once clear of the crab pots, we opened up the twin 250 Yamaha outboards and came quickly up onto plane over waves of less than a foot. These were the Saltwater Series II engines with OX66 advanced fuel injection. The dual controls made one-handed operation of both engines a breeze. The Yamaha engine management system digital readouts on the dash provided precise information on each engine's RPM and fuel consumption as well as the boat's speed.

They confirmed the results from the factory tests, which show that you'll burn 3.85 gallons per hour when you're trolling all day at six miles per hour at 1000 RPM, and about 22.8 gallons per hour cruising at about 30 miles per hour at 4000 RPM out to where the fish are biting and back. With the throttle wide open, at 5700 RPM, you'll be doing an exhilarating 46 MPH, but you'll be burning 59.35 gallons per hour. There are two fuel tanks with a total of 306 gallons.

The helm on this boat was protected by an optional hard top and enclosures all around. There's a lockable electronics console on top of the dash and two more overhead. Hydraulic steering is standard, and the 316-grade stainless steel wheel tilts to suit your driving style. Your co-pilot sits in a comfortable bench seat to port.

The cuddy cabin has a good amount of headroom and features a galley station to port with a molded fiberglass sink, a dual electric/alcohol single-burner stove, microwave and small DC refrigerator. The V-berth doubles as a dinette, with the table lowering down as the insert. There's an aft double berth tucked underneath the helm deck with additional rod storage overhead. The enclosed head features an electric flush toilet with a hand-held shower head.

The big, 74-square-foot cockpit boasts a built-in bench seat across the transom that lifts up to access the batteries and switches. In the port aft corner is a 20-gallon live well with an outboard drain. There are bolster pads around the 29-inch-high gunwale, and rod storage underneath, along with a nifty toe rail for extra traction when fighting from either side. The cockpit sole is reinforced if you want to install a fighting chair.

The transom door opens up onto the integral swim platform. Facing forward, you'll find a bait prep station behind the helm seat with a deep, bifurcated sink and lockable tackle drawers beneath. The step up to the helm deck opens up for more storage. Under the seat to port there's a 275-quart insulated fish box with an outboard drain.

The walkaround decks are recessed all the way up to the bow, providing sure footing for a safe, secure feeling when docking, anchoring, or casting off the bow. An anchor windlass is available as an option, as are air conditioning, a generator, outriggers and other extras.