Tiara 3200 Open
DECEMBER 2003
 
   
Length overall  35'1"
Beam 13'
Draft  3'
Displacement  12,500 lb
Fuel Capacity  256 gals
Water Capacity  38 gals
Base Price  $229,700


David Coleman of Portland Boatworks (above) takes the helm, which features a high dash with pent of room for electronic displays. (below) The comfortable curved settee turns into a double berth, and the back cushion lifts up to form a Pullman-style berth.





The inner-spring mattress of the double island berth lifts to reveal a large storage area.

Tiara's new 3200 is an express-style cruiser with graceful lines and impressive performance that's eminently adaptable for sportfishing. At my first glimpse of this low-slung beauty, tied to the pier in Old Saybrook, Connecticut, I admired that elegant break in the shearline just forward of the cockpit, the forward-raked stanchions of the stainless bow rail contrasting with the back-swept rakishness of the tall, curved windshield and the radar arch. David Coleman of Portland Boatworks was just toweling off the transom as I came on board.

He cheerfully introduced me to some of the boat's many thoughtful details. The 60-square-foot cockpit has a folding bench seat across the transom. The seat material is actually patio furniture material stretched over an aluminum frame, so it's lightweight, comfortable, and can be removed and laundered in the washing machine. There's a comfortable aft-facing bench seat to starboard. Hatches in the sole reveal two large removable storage bins. A hand-held hot and cold shower head is handy right inside the transom door leading out onto the 30-inch-wide swim platform. This can be removed for the sportfish option. The 28-inch high gunwales are bolstered all around.

'In lieu of the aft facing seat, a bait prep center and tackle storage unit can be added as an option,' Coleman explained. 'The flush floor storage boxes can be outfitted with macerators for use as fishboxes, and a livewell can be added in place of the fold-down transom seat. There's also an option for lockable rod storage under the coaming, and the swim platform is optional.'

Molded steps lead up to the wide side decks and on up to the foredeck, where a deep anchor locker and an integral bow pulpit are the key features.

The radar arch supports the optional hard top that protects the helm deck. The curved panes of the windshield have remarkably little distortion. Oversized windshield wipers keep everything clean, though the ride is so dry, you'd rarely need them. The center pane has an opening port controlled by an electronic actuator, and the hardtop has two Bomar hatches overhead for additional ventilation.

The helm has a high dash with plenty of room for electronic displays. There's great visibility all around, whether standing or sitting on the wide helm seat. The L-shaped settee to port has a large amount of storage underneath. The 'L' section lifts up to reveal a built-in insulated cooler with an overboard drain, keeping beverages handy to pilot and passengers alike. The forward section of the settee lifts out to allow the helm deck to hinge up to reveal the twin 8.1 Crusader 385 hp engines. It's all very well insulated to provide quite an acceptable sound level at full throttle. A smaller hatch in the center provides access for routine checks.

Three steps lead down the companionway to the open cabin below. Brightly finished teak-and-holly sole, cherry cabinetry, together with the fawn Ultraleather upholstery and off-white headliner and light faux marble countertop, all provide a clean, elegant feel. The galley's along the port side, with a full five-foot-long counter providing plenty of workspace. Corian lids cover the stainless-steel sink and the two-burner flush-top electric stove. A microwave built into the cabinet below provides any additional cooking ability. A small under-the-counter fridge and a coffee maker built into the cupboard above round out the amenities, and there's about as much storage as you'd need for cooking at that level.

Across from the galley, there's a comfortable settee curved around an adjustable table. This turns into a double berth, and the back cushion lifts up with straps to form a kid-friendly Pullman-style berth. A double island berth with an innerspring mattress lies centerline in the bow. This lifts up with the help of gas pistons to reveal a large storage area for linens and other bulky items. A curtain provides a modicum of privacy. The Sharp flat-screen TV is cleverly mounted into a hinged cabinet door so it's viewable from the settee when closed and from the bow berth when opened. The enclosed head aft of the galley has six-foot headroom and doubles as a shower stall.

With the tour complete, we started the engines, dropped the lines, and headed away from the dock. A 10-knot southwest breeze swept across Long Island Sound as we headed out of Old Saybrook onto a two-to-three-foot chop. Heading west, we ran 26.7 knots at 3200 rpm and a solid 35 knots wide open at 4500; then heading east against the current, we got a GPS reading of 23.6 knots at cruise and 31.5 wide open. The hull has a sharp entry with lifting strakes and partial propeller pockets to provide lift and yet give the blades of the prop plenty of bite. The props are so far apart that a bow thruster is unnecessary. Acceleration is astonishing from cruise to wide open, and it's very responsive and maneuverable.

Tiara's preliminary performance report indicates a fuel consumption rate of 32.1 gallons per hour at 3197 rpm for an estimated range of 202 statute miles on a full tank of 256 gallons.